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Masters
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« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2009, 11:04:10 PM »

Shalom & Welcome to W2ZF (Way to Zion Forum) Wink- Things are getting very interesting... Thanks for the passport info...

Blessings...

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ahoy
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« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2009, 01:11:09 PM »

I have done exactly the same as xsalthym suggests and then some; among other things I keep a few gas cans full of gas so that my mobility is not inhibited by infrastructure hiccups.  As for "The Mark", I have reservations as to how and when that will go down. I also agree with ifree, it would be most difficult for anyone but a chronic homeless person to slip through the grid in this age of information.  I tend to think we will have a shut-down of the borders (probably resulting from another staged biomass crisis or psudo-terrorist event) before Pharaoh lets the people go.

I also wouldn't disagree with Nazway's preps.  Joseph had ample warning and 7 years to store before the famine; he took prudent measures to store up what he could.  Let's learn from the ant...  I am not in the self-sufficient farmer situation myself, but I have done some research on distillation so that I know how to make my own alcohol (for auto fuel).  Technically, to do so, you need a lot of sugar based biomass, the gear (typically under $500 or even $100 for a crude system), water, and the ATF permit (which is currently free).  Those who desire the ability to maintain self sufficiency may want to ponder that capability and apply for a permit sooner as opposed to later, when Gore's greeneys have their way with CO2 and the like.  Note that the very same distillation equipment can be used to make clean water as well.  There are also some simple car alternator conversions you can do (posted on Youtube) for making electric windmills with simple hand tools and PVC pipe and batteries and over the counter AC/DC inverters.  You can probably design/buy/build a complete system for about $500, the majority of the cost being batteries and inverters.  Such a system may not generate enough power to run your entire house or even your washing machine every day, but a little electric light and well pump (although most pumps are probably 220v) operation may come in really handy if the grid has nothing to offer.  If anything else, it could be a really nice "Sabbath system" that allows you to help the rest of the world keep the Sabbath commands (i.e. Ex 20:10, aliens resting "within our gates").

Consider Jeremiah: 
  • Jer 29:7 Also, seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the LORD for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper.
Consider Proverbs:
  • Pr 3:5 Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding;
  • Pr 3:6 in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight.

Let's pray for the peace of Jerusalem, but also for the peace and prosperity of "Babylon the Great".

Shalom,
-Andy
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dumbrod
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« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2009, 10:20:40 PM »

I think it will be up to those who can to take care of the elderly.  Its not an every man for himself kind of deal (I keep needing to remind myself of this).  My primary concern is providing for my family, and then after that trying to set aside some extra preps (food) for extended family and those who can't afford it.  The problem is we don't know when and how long or even if something will happen so it makes it very difficult to know what and how much to set aside.  I often get the feeling that whatever I do is never enough (Hopefully it will be manna time before hunger time).

I think monte's article was decent, but went too far in saying what will happen when we really aren't told.  It does, however, give people a reason to pause and think about what they will do when stuff hits the fan.  I think we all need a plan A, B, and C.

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donaldb65
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« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2009, 10:20:33 PM »

I am setting up my motorhome as my main bug out bag.  If the time comes to leave, we will leave the house and head for the hills.  Which hills?  Only Yah knows.  I hope to find like minded Torah believers as so we can help each other.
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dumbrod
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« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2009, 11:18:47 PM »

I guess I won't plan on you coming here.  There are NO hills anywhere to be seen. hehe

 Shocked
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donaldb65
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« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2009, 11:28:54 PM »

Well you are my favorite organic farmer you know.  You never know who can show up on the farm...lol

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Torahman_2
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« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2009, 07:12:05 PM »

We have been reading the comments about Torah communities - all very good points. We have been in communications with several groups that want to participate, form or do something collectively, but none of these people know how to identify the others. Not that they are looking for a large group - they simply feel they need to give, participate, and be part of preparing a place of safety for the future. Also, get to know the others to form relationship. How can these people start and where. There seems to be one common issue. They all have various funds/talents/items of worth to contribute and can not do the whole thing themselves. What does a person do - other than continue to pray and seek - yet at the same time honor a level of obscurity
thanks

Torahman_2
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elle.mental
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« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2010, 09:46:47 PM »

I began this thread in May of 2009. At which time I was preparing mentally for a big change in the life of our family. My question to myself was: Is it possible for those of us who are believers in Torah and Yeshua to do as the Jews have done throughout time...to find each other and set up a network that supports our way of life. This doesn't have to be a "run for the hills" kind of scenario, if you are having to run for the hills there is no time for building community, you either already have it or it's everyone for themselves. I am talking about life where ever we are, knowing and supporting the people of our faith community. Do you farm for a living and know a Torah believing family that could use produce in return for hours spent weeding? Is there a doctor who would take produce and milk in trade for a well baby check-up or some other equivilent? Would you do your best to hire at your business a Torah observant young man who needs a job that will allow him off for Shabbat and feast days? These are the kind of things I would like to see happening amongst Torah believers in the Messiah. To think of ourselves as members of a "community", not as "believers" that survive within the constraints of the "world". I think people like the "idea" of community, it is much harder to make the idea into reality. It takes investment in the lives of others, it takes a concerted effort to think of ourselves differently, as part of something much larger than our family or immediate circle of friends. We have to want to let go of our independence and look to be interdependent. It is not a "common purse" I am searching for, we know from the Brit that it didn't work then and it won't work now... I am looking for people with a common purpose, that being, to live out a Torah life and help others to do the same until which time we are called to return to the Land. We won't be able to make it as part of "society" for much longer, our compliance with the strictures of Torah already make that difficult at best. To be set apart truely means to be "set apart", to draw away from the homogenous masses and be a peculiar people. But we can't do it alone...we need each other.
   
 
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elle.mental
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« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2010, 11:00:30 PM »

I ran out of space in the middle of my rant...I hate it when that happens  Wink
   In the Spring of 2009, without preamble, our lives changed. I won't go into the particulars, but in the course of six weeks, we sold or gave away practically everything we owned. We packed our few well chosen belongings (which BTW had to go on the plane with us) and moved to Costa Rica. We left behind our paid for homestead, "safe room", a three year supply of food for 4 and all the supplies you would need to survive a breakdown in the fabric of society. As well as friends and family. It was sobering to go through all of that "letting go". But we felt like it was the thing that Yahweh was leading/dragging us to do. What did we move to Costa Rica for?  Isn't that in the wrong direction? Shouldn't we be looking towards moving back to the Land? All of these questions swirled around in our heads. But the reality was that Yahweh made the way, provided us with a 15 hectare farm( about 35 acres) with a house, a 500 sq.ft. guest cottage and the most incredible view of Lake Arenal and rolling green mountains that we could enjoy as we worked the land. Why? I have asked myself that 1000 times since we got here. But, 7 months into this journey I think I have a possible answer. There is a little Torah community here, several families that have for various reasons left the states to come to this spot and make a life out of nothing. Due to our "tourist" status, none of us can earn a living. We are all just "hovering", living life day to day and working hard to keep afloat. But here on the edge of the rainforest, I believe that Yahweh is teaching us all how to be a community. We are diverse in backgrounds, and in some aspects diverse in theology, but we all believe in Yahweh, His Torah and Yeshua His Messiah. We keep the feasts together, have gatherings for other things like birthdays and Bat Mitzvahs, and keep up with daily life events on Facebook. I know that if I need them any one of them would make dusty, bumpy trip up my mountain to render assiatance. I think the key ingredient to success here is that Yahweh has put us in the position to need each other. We can be set apart, because we are already set apart by the fact that we are "gringos" in a "Tico" society. I think Yahweh is giving us a first hand look at how Abraham felt, to leave everything and follow Him, to be a sojourner in a foreign land. To make a life out of nothing, and do it as a community.
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Galil
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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2010, 05:20:44 PM »

elle
does the costa rican community talk about getting closer together?  That is close in location, to share labor and resources.  To interact with each other on a daily basis.  To move together if necessary under divine direction.
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